Franco Ferrari publishes commentary on the Rome Regulation on the Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations (Rome I)

Professor Ferrari has just published with Oxford University Press the second edition of an article-by-article commentary on the Regulation (EC) No 593/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 on the law applicable to contractual obligations, of which he is also a co-author. As Professor Ferrari writes in the Preface to the book authored by an international group of academics and practitioners, parties to any transaction require predictability and legal certainty, as it is the predictability and legal certainty that allow the parties to assess the legal and economic risks involved in the transaction and, thus, allows them to decide whether to enter into the transaction at all. This need is felt even more strongly where the transaction is not a purely domestic one but is linked to more than one country. To reach the desired predictability and legal certainty in an international context, various approaches have been resorted to. The drafting of uniform rules of private international law is one such approach. It aims at guaranteeing that courts in the States where such uniform rules are in force will apply the same substantive rules no matter what court a dispute is brought before, thus reducing transactions costs by requiring a party to make provision for one law only. The Regulation (EC) No 593/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 on the law applicable to contractual obligations (Rome I) sets forth such a set of uniform private international law rules for (most of) the member states of the EU. The book provides students and practitioners with a concise and instructive article-by-article commentary which explains the underlying concepts and suggests solutions for problems that have arisen or may arise in the application of the Regulation.

Franco Ferrari appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration

At the end of November 2019, Professor Franco Ferrari, the Center’s Director, was appointed as a member of the Advisory Committee of the Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration (SCCA). The Advisory Committee is composed of 14 Committee members (residing in 11 different countries with 10 different nationalities), each of whom was selected after a vigorous process of identifying leading international arbitration specialists. The Committee’s main task will be to advise the SCCA on its services and products to secure and promote international best practices and standards. In particular, the Committee will provide guidance on future revisions of the SCCA’s rules and procedures.

Franco Ferrari reappointed as President of the THAC Arbitrator Committee

On September 23, 2019, Professor Ferrari, the Director of the Center, was reappointed as President of the Thailand Arbitrator Committee established at the Thailand Arbitration Center (THAC) for a period of three years. The tasks of the President of the Arbitrators Committee are outlined in the Arbitrator Committee Rules. In light of these Rules, Professor Ferrari will preside of the meetings in which the Thailand Arbitrator Committee will take decisions regarding the challenges to arbitrators. As President of the Arbitrator Committee, Professor Ferrari will, however, be the sole responsible for appointments and removals of arbitrators.

Franco Ferrari publishes a paper on contracts of carriage and international conventions

Professor Ferrari, the Center’s Director, has just published a paper in the Oslo Law Review. The paper addresses the contentious relationship between uniform substantive law conventions and private international law rules in relation to contracts of carriage. In the paper, Professor Ferrari discusses why resort to private international law has to give way to the application of uniform substantive law conventions. The paper was presented at a conference that took place in Oslo in May 2018.

Franco Ferrari gives a talk on economic hardship under the CISG at Bucerius Law School in Hamburg

On April 9, 2019, Professor Ferrari gave a talk on “Hardship-Clauses in International Sales Contracts” on the occasion of a workshop co-hosted by the Center and Bucerius Law School on the occasion of the 3rd Hamburg Arbitration Day. The talk by Professor Ferrari focused on how the economic crisis has affected long-term international sales agreements, more specifically, whether the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods deals with economic hardship and what consequences the answer to this question triggers.

Franco Ferrari speaks on economic hardship at City University of Hong Kong School of Law

On February 18, 2019, Professor Ferrari gave a talk on “Economic Hardship under the CISG: A Hard Issue”. The talk focused on how the economic crisis has affected long-term international sales agreements. Plummeting prices led to importers wanting to get out of these long-term agreements. Professor Ferrari’s talk addressed the issue of whether the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods answers the question of whether importers can do so or not .

Franco Ferrari gives a talk at the City University of Hong Kong

On May 17, 2018, Professor Ferrari gave a talk on “Bridging the Gap between International Commercial and Investment Arbitration” at a two-day conference that took place at the City University of Hong Kong entitled “Conference on Dispute Resolution in Asia and Beyond: Progress and Trends”. The presentation by Professor Ferrari was based on a paper co-authored by Professor Ferrari and Dr. Friedrich Rosenfeld, a Global Adjunct Professor at NYU Law in Paris, published in the NYU Journal of Law & Business (vol. 12: 295) analyzing the interaction of between the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards of 1958 (New York Convention) and international investment law. The starting point of their analysis are the cases in which the domestic authorities in the country where enforcement of an arbitral award is sought unduly interfere with the enforcement instead of taking the arbitration-friendly stance required by imposed by the New York Convention. In these instances, a success in arbitration proceedings may turn out to be a mere pyrrhic victory. This holds true, in particular, where all of the debtor’s assets are located in one jurisdiction. Here, a contracting state’s compliance deficit with the New York Convention cannot be mitigated by seeking enforcement in a different contracting state. In response to these shortcomings, investors have begun to exploit the linkages between the New York Convention and the regime of international investment law.

Professor Franco Ferrari gives a talk at Oslo conference on conflict of laws

On May 2, 2018, Professor Ferrari gave a talk on the occasion of a conference held in Oslo. The Norwegian Ministry of Justice has requested Professor Giuditta Cordero‐Moss, a professor at the University of Oslo, to submit a proposal for a statute on choice of law rules for contractual and non‐contractual obligations. The conference Professor Ferrari attended was organized to ensure that the proposal would reflect state‐of‐the‐art knowledge in the area of conflict of laws at the international level. As for Professor Ferrari, he addressed the relationship between conflict of laws rules and uniform substantive rules and propose a statutory provision aimed at ensuring the primacy of uniform substantive law.

Franco Ferrari co-authors second edition of a book on “International Sales Law – CISG in a nutshell”

Professor Ferrari has just published the second edition of a book co-authored with Professor Marco from Verona University School of Law on the 1980 United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. The Convention, which covers more than 3/4 of world trade, is in force in 91 States, including the United States and its most important trading partners. The book, which is part of West’s Nutshell series and is aimed at both practitioners and scholars, covers the Convention’s basic rules one should be aware of, so as to avoid surprises when doing business with parties having their place of business in other countries.

Franco Ferrari co-edits and co-authors book on “International Contract Law” in German

Professor Ferrari has just published the third edition of a book entitled “International Contract Law” in German. Like the previous two editions, the book contains article-by-article commentaries of the most important conflict of laws and substantive law instruments addressing international contracts applicable in Europe, namely the Regulation (EC) No 593/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 on the law applicable to contractual obligations (Rome I), the 1980 United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), the 1956 Convention on Carriage of Goods by Road, and the 1988 UNIDROIT Convention on International Factoring.  The 1750 page book allows practitioners and scholars to find guidance on how to solve the most intricate conflict of laws and substantive law problems falling under the purview of the aforementioned instruments. This is also why the courts of several countries, including the German Supreme Court (most recently in its decision of 7 December 2017, docket n. VII ZR 101/14), and the Austrian Supreme Court (most recently in its decision of 29 November 2017, docket n. 8Ob12/17y), have had resort to the earlier editions of the book.

Franco Ferrari co-edits an anthology on “Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments”

Professor Ferrari has just co-edited (together with Professors Linda J. Silberman, the Clarence D. Ashley Professor of Law of NYU School of Law) an anthology on the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. This anthology offers a 24-article tour of the history, principles and future of the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. The collection of seminal pieces selected reflects the viewpoints of authors from different countries and legal systems and explores different approaches to, and comparative perspectives of, judgment recognition and enforcement. Topics covered include the special issues of the revenue rule and the role of public law, the effects of fraud, the scope of preclusion, and the impact of class actions. The collection also looks to the future, considering possible solutions to harmonizing recognition and enforcement and assessing how the development of human rights may impact judgement recognition and enforcement. Prefaced by an original and informative introduction by the editors, the anthology is an essential resource for those studying, researching or practicing in this area.

Franco Ferrari publishes paper on Italian Supreme Court’s decision recognizing a foreign punitive damages award

Professor Ferrari has just published a paper (in the Italian Rivista di diritto civile (2018), 280) on a decision by the Italian Supreme Court, rendered on 5 July 2017, which for the first time ever recognized a US decision awarding punitive damages. In his paper, Professor Ferrari, an expert inter alia on European conflict of laws, compares the Italian decision with decisions rendered both in Germany and France and concludes that the Italian Supreme Court’s decision is basically in line with those of the Supreme Courts of Germany and France, even though the Italian Supreme Court expressly sets forth certain requirements for the recognition that prima facie are required neither under German nor under French case law.

Franco Ferrari lectures at Bayreuth University on forum shopping

On March 15, 2018, Professor Ferrari gave a talk in German on “forum shopping and the new rules of the German Arbitration Institution” (DIS) on the occasion of a two-day conference focusing on the new arbitration rules that came into force on March 1, 2018. In his talk, Professor Ferrari focused on what characteristics of the new DIS rules may lead parties to choose the new rules over the rules of other arbitration institutions when opting for arbitration over litigation in courts.

Book co-edited by Franco Ferrari wins award from the American Society of International Law

In mid-January 2018, the American Society of International Law (ASIL) announced that it would award its 2018 Certificate of Merit for High Technical Craftsmanship and Utility to Practicing Lawyers and Scholars to the Encyclopedia of Private International Law co-edited and co-authored by Professor Ferrari. In a memorandum, ASIL’s Book Awards Committee stated that “[t]he value and timeliness of this work to academics, international lawyers and others is difficult to over-state.” Bringing together 195 authors from 57 countries, the Encyclopedia sheds light on the current state of Private International Law around the globe, providing unique insights into the discipline and how it is affected by globalization and increased regional integration. The role and character of Private International Law has changed tremendously over the past decades. And it is these changes that the Encyclopedia focuses on. The Encyclopedia is a rich and varied resource in four volumes. The first two volumes provide comprehensive coverage of topical aspects of Private International Law in the form of 247 alphabetically arranged entries. The third volume provides insightful detail on the national Private International Law regimes of 80 different countries. The fourth volume presents invaluable, and often unique, English language translations of the national codifications and provisions of Private International Law in those countries.